The importance of why NorthStar VETS stays accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association


NorthStar VETS has been a member of the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) for years and was named their referral practice of the year in 2013, which is one of the highest honors in our industry, and one of the many awards we’ve received of which we are most proud. Here is the statement we made when we were named.

AAHA-Award-Statue2

“Our AAHA accreditation reflects NorthStar VETS’ commitment to consistently fulfilling our purpose statement: to improve the quality of life of our patients, our clients, the family veterinarian and our staff. AAHA accreditation highlights the importance of our 5 core values: professionalism, excellence, compassion, teamwork and service. As one of the few AAHA accredited referral practices, the importance of increasing public perception regarding the sophistication of our profession is paramount to us. Incorporating referral practice standards for quality patient care raises the level of care provided; it maintains a commitment to practicing quality, state-of-the-art veterinary medicine. Maintaining our AAHA accreditation holds us accountable to that commitment. The AAHA accreditation process itself was a wonderful team-building experience and our entire staff takes great pride in our AAHA achievement. As leaders in the veterinary referral field, we hope that our accreditation will inspire other practices (referral and general) to join AAHA’s commitment to meeting the highest standards in veterinary excellence in the ever-growing and rapidly-advancing veterinary industry.”

We are working here to get re-accredited and encourage all pet owners to learn more about AAHA accreditation and why it is important to the quality of veterinary care your pet receives. To get more information, visit www.aaha.org.

Rosalie LoScrudato, DVM, CVA, CCRPRosalie LoScrudato, DVM, CVA, CCRP
Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, Certified Canine Rehabilitation Practitioner
Dr. LoScrudato received her undergraduate degree from Cook College, Rutgers University, and graduated from the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine in 1990. After graduation, Dr. LoScrudato returned to New Jersey and practiced small animal medicine for 17 years, developing an interest in emergency and critical care medicine. She joined NorthStar VETS in 2007 as an emergency clinician.

Dr. LoScrudato earned her certification in veterinary acupuncture in 2009 from the Chi Institute. Dr LoScrudato started the Acupuncture service at NSV in 2009, giving our hospital another avenue to improve our patients’ comfort and function. Beginning in 2011, she transitioned from our ER department and dedicated her time to building the rehabilitation and pain management service at NSV along with Dr Pamela Levin. She completed her certification as a canine rehabilitation practitioner from the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine in 2012. Dr LoScrudato was certified in companion animal pain management in March 2015. She considers her greatest achievements her four beautiful children. Dr LoScrudato enjoys music, spending quality time with her children, and fishing.

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Does My Pet Really Need Blood Tests Before Surgery


The short answer is “yes.”

The minimum standard includes a Complete Blood Count (CBC) and Blood Chemistry Profile, however, other tests may be needed for specific situations. These might include X-rays of the chest, ultrasound of the abdomen, ultrasound of the heart, or urine checks.

Veterinary team members consulting about a patientThere are several reasons why bloodwork should be rechecked prior to any anesthesia.

  1. The complete blood count provides information regarding the red blood cell count, platelet count and white blood cell count.
    • If your pet is anemic, a blood transfusion may be necessary.
    • If the platelet count is low, your pet could have serious risks of bleeding during and after surgery (which can be fatal if unchecked).
  2. The blood chemistry profile provides information regarding your pet’s overall body function. This enables us to choose the best anesthetic medications to use for your pet, making his or her anesthesia as safe as possible.
    • Some medications can cause severe reactions if the liver is not at its full capacity.
    • Your pet may require special fluid needs if the kidney values are elevated.
    • Certain fluid types may be necessary if electrolyte disturbances are present.
    • There are other metabolic problems that can be identified on the chemistry that would require a change in the anesthetic planning.
    1. Pre-anesthesia screening should be done as close to the time of surgery as possible. If your pet is undergoing an elective procedure, results up to 1 month old are acceptible. If your pet is undergoing emergency surgery, screening tests will need to be done immediately prior to anesthesia.

      Our goal is to make your pet’s anesthesia smooth, painless, and as low risk as possible. There is always some risk to anesthesia, no matter how prepared you are; performing pre-anesthesia screening helps us to make anesthesia as safe as possible and helps us to tailor the anesthesia protocol to your pet’s specific needs.

      Daniel Stobie, DVM, MS, DACVS - Chief of StaffDaniel Stobie, DVM, MS, DACVS – Chief of Staff
      A New Jersey native, Dr. Stobie completed his undergraduate work at Cook College/Rutgers University and is a 1990 cum laude graduate of the University of Missouri-College of Veterinary Medicine. He completed an internship in small-animal medicine and surgery at the Angell Memorial Animal Hospital in Boston, then went on to complete a three-year surgical residency at the University of Minnesota and earn a Master’s Degree in Veterinary Surgery, Radiology, and Anesthesia in 1994. Dr. Stobie became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons in 1995. In 2007, he completed the mini-MBA certificate program at the Rutgers School of Business.

      To read more about Dr. Stobie, see his full bio at northstarvets.com.

      The information presented on this web site is not intended to take the place of your family veterinarian’s advice and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Discuss this information with your own veterinarian to determine what is right for your pet. All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We can not and do not give you medical advice via this blog. The information contained in this online site and emails is presented in summary form only and intended to provide broad understanding and knowledge. The information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice of your veterinarian. We do not recommend the self-management of your pet’s health problems.

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Welcome Shady to the NorthStar VETS Family


shady-tie-computerB“Shady” is the newest member of our NorthStar VETS family and goes by many different names. Mr. Shady, Shady Aquaman, Slim Shady, Nigel, the list goes on and on. His official name is Shady, and we had that name kind-of picked out before we even had him in our arms. We saw pictures of Shady when he was 8-weeks old. Considering he would be the hospital cat for our Maple Shade facility and the fact that he is a lovely smokey grey color, the client service representatives at the Maple Shade facility thought “Shady” would be perfect! Dr. Kimberly Hammer, in charge of the NorthStar VETS Blood Bank for Dogs and Cats, took multiple names from the ones suggested on our Facebook page and had the employees vote on the best one and well, Shady won! He certainly lives up to his name. He will stay in your shadow if you are walking around the facility. He does not like to be left alone, even during bathroom breaks he must tag along. The way he walks suits his name well too as he has this strange, slinky, low to the ground movement when he’s lurking behind you. Shady is the most affectionate kitty if he knows you, and will instantly turn over for a belly rub if you offer them. He loves chasing imaginary things in our huge windows at Maple Shade and he will eat anything you put in front of him. All of us at NorthStar VETS who have had the chance to meet Shady have fallen in love with his fluffy fur and his sweet heart.

Shady also has a rare blood type for cats. He is blood type B which is only found in one percent of the domestic shorthair population. Cats with type B blood who need a transfusion can only receive type B blood. When Shady is full-grown, he will join our blood donor program to help cats in need. His rare blood type will be life-saving! If you have a cat or dog who you think would make a good blood donor, please visit the Blood Bank page on our web site and take the quiz to see if he/she would be eligible.

Kimberly Hammer, VMD, DACVIMKimberly Hammer, VMD, DACVIM
Dr. Hammer graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 2000. She then spent a year at Mississippi State University for a small animal internship and then returned to UPENN for a 2-year residency in small animal internal medicine. She earned board certification from the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in 2004. Dr. Hammer’s professional interests include endocrinology, hepatic and gastrointestinal disease, renal disease, and critical care medicine to name a few. Deeply committed to her patients, Dr. Hammer’s primary goal is to provide the very best patient care, both diagnostically and therapeutically. She joined the NorthStar VETS team in September 2007.

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Winston the Westie battles Craniomandibular Osteopathy


Winston the WestieWinston is an 8-month-old, intact male, West Highland White Terrier who presented to our hospital for lethargy. He was the first puppy owned by this family. Everything was normal and he seemed in good health until the day after he went to see his family veterinarian. After his visit, he was lethargic and reluctant to eat, which was cause for concern for his owners. At the time of admission to NorthStar VETS, he was eating small amounts of soft food with some effort. Labwork done by his family veterinarian showed mild anemia and an increase in ALP and phosphorus which was considered normal in a puppy. A 4DX test was negative. He had seemed painful when eating for the past few days.

Upon examination, he was reluctant to move, but the most dramatic finding was reluctance to open his mouth. He cried if his mouth was opened more than 2 inches. He also had soft tissue swelling on the top of his head.

The technicians who took care of Winston overnight noted his painful state while they kept him on IV fluids, antibiotics and pain medication. By the next morning, his fever had resolved.

Winston's RadiographRadiographs showed changes consistent with craniomandubular osteopathy, a congenital disorder common in the Westie breed, that is an excessive and abnormal bone growth on the skull (cranium) and lower jaw (mandible) causing pain and discomfort. It is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait in West Highland White Terriers. It can be seen in other breeds as well. It occurs in growing puppies (3-to-10-months of age). In this disease, normal bone is replaced by fibrous bone. It most commonly affects the mandible, but in Winston, the bones of the head were severely affected. If the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) is affected, then difficulty grasping, chewing and swallowing food is seen. Fever occurs frequently and there is pain associated with palpation on petting the head and pain upon opening the mouth. Weight loss and progressive loss of the muscle of chewing can be seen. Prognosis depends on the areas affected and the ability to provide supportive care.

Winston with his familySupportive care includes treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs and analgesics (pain medications). Dogs on chronic therapy should be monitored closely and will require therapy adjustments based on clinical course and monitoring of labwork (chemistry and cbc). In some cases, feeding tubes can be used to help maintain nutrition.

Prevention of this disease can only occur if affected animals carrying this recessive gene are not bred.

Winston responded very well to anti-inflammatory doses of prednisone for 6 weeks. Unfortunately, after 8 weeks off of prednisone, his signs recurred and the prednisone needed to be resumed. He will need monthly rechecks and in a few months he will be taken off of the prednisone once again. He is becoming more puppy-like now that he is feeling better. It is a benign disease, that Winston should grow out of as he gets bigger, so the prognosis for this adorable little guy is favorable at this time.

Tammy Anderson, DVM, DACVIMTammy Anderson, DVM, DACVIM
Dr. Anderson is a New Jersey native who received her veterinary medical degree from Ohio State University in 1995. She completed her small animal internship at Michigan State University in 1996, and her residency in small animal internal medicine at the University of Tennessee in 1999. She remained at UT as an assistant professor of small animal medicine until 2001, when she returned to New Jersey and entered private practice. Dr. Anderson joined NorthStar VETS in 2004.


The information presented on this web site is not intended to take the place of your family veterinarian’s advice and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Discuss this information with your own veterinarian to determine what is right for your pet. All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We can not and do not give you medical advice via this blog. The information contained in this online site and emails is presented in summary form only and intended to provide broad understanding and knowledge. The information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice of your veterinarian. We do not recommend the self-management of your pet’s health problems.

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Hills Science Diet issues voluntary market withdrawal of eight popular products


For reasons that have yet to be disclosed, select Hill’s Science Diet products have been removed from PetSmart retail locations as a result of a “voluntary market withdrawal.”

Shoppers were surprised to find out that as many as eight canned dog food products were affected by the withdrawal, which will continue through the 18th of December.

But this is not to be confused with a product recall – according to the Food and Drug Administration, a Market Withdrawal “occurs when a product has a minor violation that would not be subject to FDA legal action. The firm removes the product from the market or corrects the violation,” as per the FDA website. “For example, a product removed from the market due to tampering, without evidence of manufacturing or distribution problems, would be a market withdrawal.”

Pet owners who did not come in contact with the posting should note that the following products have been affected:

  • Science Diet Dog Adult Perfect Weight 
12.8 oz 
SKU 5210092
UPC 5274229750
All Date Codes/All Best Before Dates
  • Ideal Balance Slim – Healthy Chicken
 12.8 oz
SKU 5210280
UPC 5274230770
All Date Codes/All Best Before Dates
  • Science Diet Dog Small – Toy Adult Beef Entrée 
5.8 oz.
 SKU 5092280
UPC 5274249660
All Date Codes/All Best Before Dates
  • Science Diet Dog Small – Toy Mature Beef Entrée 
5.8 oz
 SKU 5092282
UPC 5274249680
All Date Codes/All Best Before Dates
  • Science Diet Dog Adult Beef Entrée
 13 oz.
SKU 5117274
UPC 5274270390
All Date Codes/All Best Before Dates
  • Science Diet Dog Adult Beef – Chicken Entrée
 13 oz.
 SKU 5117273
UPC 5274270400
All Date Codes/All Best Before Dates
  • Science Diet Dog Mature Beef Entrée
 13 oz.
 SKU 5117275
UPC 5274270560
All Date Codes/All Best Before Dates

Those with outstanding questions should contact Hill’s Science Customer Service by calling 800-445-5777 between the hours of 8am and 5pm CST, Monday through Friday.


The information presented on this web site is not intended to take the place of your family veterinarian’s advice and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Discuss this information with your own veterinarian to determine what is right for your pet. All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We can not and do not give you medical advice via this blog. The information contained in this online site and emails is presented in summary form only and intended to provide broad understanding and knowledge. The information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice of your veterinarian. We do not recommend the self-management of your pet’s health problems.

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Deadly Amanita “Death Cap” Mushroom Toxicity


Alert from the Emergency and Critical Care Service at NorthStar VETS:
We have had four cases (one confirmed, and three other suspected) of young dogs with acute liver failure secondary to suspected Amanita mushroom ingestion. These cases have been in Robbinsville, Princeton Junction, Hamilton, and Mt. Holly New Jersey.

Signs start with vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, and low blood sugar, and progress to severe clotting disorder, ALT liver value elevation, neurologic impairment, and ultimately death.

Amanita 'Death Cap' MushroomWhat to do:

  • Inspect your yard for any mushrooms, take pictures, remove them, and try to identify them.
  • Consider walking your dog on leash to monitor and try to prevent ingestion.
  • If your dog ingested mushrooms, bring them to the hospital right away so that vomiting can be induced, and further options discussed based on the type of mushroom ingested.

How to Identify:

  • Look up pictures of Amanita online.
  • Call HUMAN Poison control and email them a picture, they may help identify them.
  • Visit NAMYCO.org, an organization of mycologists that can help identify these mushrooms from pictures via email.

How to Treat:

  • Prevent exposure.
  • The earlier the recognition and intervention, the better. There are measures we can take to decontaminate beyond emesis, but we must intervene very early.
  • Supportive care for liver failure with antioxidants, vitamin K, plasma transfusions, and other medications. At this point prognosis is guarded to poor.

If you have questions about these mushrooms, contact the North American Mycological Association. If your pet is ill or you suspect they ate one of these mushrooms, contact your family veterinarian immediately or bring them to NorthStar VETS.

Barbara Maton, DVM, DACVECCBarbara Maton, DVM, DACVECC
Dr. Maton is originally from Florida, where she earned her undergraduate degree in biology from the University of North Florida, and studied veterinary medicine at the University of Florida, obtaining her DVM in 2006. She completed a rotating internship focused on emergency medicine at SouthPaws Veterinary Specialists and Emergency Center in Virginia, then moved to Pittsburgh where she worked as an emergency veterinarian for two years and completed her residency in the specialty in 2012. After helping to start a critical care service at an established veterinary referral hospital in Delaware, she joined NorthStar VETS in 2014. Her clinical and research interests include trauma, electrolyte derangements, anticoagulant therapies and CPR medicine.


The information presented on this web site is not intended to take the place of your family veterinarian’s advice and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Discuss this information with your own veterinarian to determine what is right for your pet. All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We can not and do not give you medical advice via this blog. The information contained in this online site and emails is presented in summary form only and intended to provide broad understanding and knowledge. The information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice of your veterinarian. We do not recommend the self-management of your pet’s health problems.

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National Canine Lymphoma Awareness Day


Lymphoma is a cancer of the white blood cells. When it comes to discovering this disease, typically, pet owners will feel lymph nodes under the chin, and that’s the first sign of disease. Sometimes, our patients come in for other signs, such as drinking more or lethargy. Fortunately, this disease carries a good prognosis with 80-90 percent responding to treatment and going into remission with a good quality of life for a year. This disease is treated with chemotherapy.

I really try hard to not let my patients get sick, and most patients do not have any significant signs through treatment. In fact, I had one patient continue to compete in dog agility while on chemotherapy! So if your dog is diagnosed with lymphoma, I urge you to talk to your family veterinarian about treatment and referral to a Veterinary Oncologist for treatment.


Here is the story behind getting November 7th officially named Canine Lymphoma Awareness Day.

Jennifer Kim, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology)Jennifer Kim, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology)
Dr. Kim grew up in New York and received her BA from the University of Pennsylvania. After two years at the National Cancer Institute performing cancer genetic research, she attended veterinary school at Tufts University. Dr. Kim completed a rotating internship at the Animal Medical Center in Manhattan, New York, and an oncology internship at Cornell University. She began at NorthStar VETS as an emergency clinician in 2005 and returned in 2010 to treat oncology patients after completing her residency in medical oncology at Michigan State University School of Veterinary Medicine. In her free time, Dr. Kim is an avid foodie and knitter.

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Good n Fun Beefhide Chicken Sticks recalled for potential Salmonella contamination


If you have recently purchased Good ‘n’ Fun Beefhide Chicken Stix from a Dollar General or Dollar Tree store, do not give them to your dog and do not take the sticks out of the package. Salix Animal Health is voluntarily recalling one lot of the product that may have been contaminated with Salmonella potentially affecting both dogs that eat the sticks and humans who handle the sticks.

Although no reports of illness in pets or people have been reported, the affected packages should be disposed of properly.

Good 'n; Fun Beefhide Chicken Sticks

Recall specifics

The recalled packages are 2.8 ounce bags of Good ‘n’ Fun Beefhide Chicken Sticks that were distributed in only Dollar General or Dollar Tree stores.

To determine if you purchased the recalled product, look at the lot code and expiration date on the product package. The bags are stamped on the backside with lot #AO15010 and the expiration date of 03/2018. The UPC code on the bag is 0 91093 82247 1.

Disposing of the recalled packages

Leave the sticks in the package and either dispose of the product in the trash or return it for a full refund. For information on returning the product, contact Salix’s consumer affairs team at 1-800-338-4896, Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Eastern Standard Time.

Affects of Salmonella on dogs

Dogs and other pets that have been infected with Salmonella may have the following symptoms:

  • Lethargy
  • Diarrhea or bloody diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Vomiting
  • Decreased appetite
  • Fever
  • Abdominal pain

Not all dogs that have been infected with Salmonella will have these symptoms, but they could be carriers of the bacteria and infect other pets or humans. If your dog has consumed Good ‘n’ Fun Beefhide Chicken Sticks and has any of these symptoms, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Affects of Salmonella on humans

Salmonella can infect anyone, but the elderly, those who are pregnant, and the very young are most vulnerable to the bacteria. People infected with Salmonella may have the following symptoms:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea or bloody diarrhea
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Fever

According the FDA, Salmonella can also result in more serious problems, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms, but this is rare.

If you have handled Good ‘n’ Fun Beefhide Chicken Sticks and exhibit any of the symptoms of Salmonella, contact your healthcare provider immediately.

Customers with additional questions about the recall can call Salix’s consumer affairs team at the number listed above.


The information presented on this web site is not intended to take the place of your family veterinarian’s advice and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Discuss this information with your own veterinarian to determine what is right for your pet. All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We can not and do not give you medical advice via this blog. The information contained in this online site and emails is presented in summary form only and intended to provide broad understanding and knowledge. The information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice of your veterinarian. We do not recommend the self-management of your pet’s health problems.

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Pulmonic Stenosis and Balloon Valvuloplasty in Dogs


Daisy resting comfortably at home.

Daisy resting comfortably at home.

Daisy is a 10-month-old, female English bulldog who was diagnosed with severe congenital heart disease called pulmonic stenosis. This condition can lead to congestive heart failure and a poor long-term prognosis if left untreated. Fortunately, we were able to perform a balloon valvuloplasty (cardiac catheterization procedure) at NorthStar VETS to help improve her heart function and quality of life!

Pulmonic stenosis, known as PS, is one of the most common congenital heart diseases in dogs. It can be accompanied by additional heart defects and develop into a life-threatening condition or it can be mild enough to be no more than a surprising incidental finding. Pulmonic stenosis refers to a stenosis or constriction of the right ventricular outflow tract.

Pulmonic stenosis is most commonly seen in English bulldogs like Daisy, as well as Terriers, Miniature Schnauzers, American Cocker Spaniels, Samoyeds, Keeshounds, Mastiffs and Beagles. A hereditary bases for PS has been proven in Beagles and is suspected in other breeds.

Daisy-EchoIn order to understand what pulmonic stenosis is, it is necessary to understand some normal heart anatomy. The heart sits more or less centrally in the chest and is divided into a left side, which receives oxygen-rich blood from the lungs and pumps it to the rest of the body; and a right side, which receives “used” blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs to pick up fresh oxygen. Because the left side of the heart must supply blood to the whole body, its muscle is especially thick and strong while the right side, which only pumps to one nearby area, tends to be thinner. When the ventricles pump, the blood from the left shoots through the aortic valve and the blood from the right side shoots through the pulmonic valve. These valves snap sharply closed after the pumping is done. The area where the blood exits the right ventricle is called the right ventricular outflow tract and it consists of the exit area of the ventricle, the pulmonic valve, and the main pulmonary artery.

In pulmonic stenosis, the right ventricular outflow tract is narrowed either at the actual valve, just before it, or just after it. The most common form of pulmonic stenosis involves a deformed pulmonary valve such that the valve leaflets are too thick, the valve cusps are fused, or the opening is too narrow such as in the formation of an aberrant coronary artery. The heart must pump extra hard to get the blood through this unusually narrow, stiff valve. The right side of the heart becomes thick from all this extra work which may result in abnormal electrical conduction of the heart, leading to arrhythmias. In some cases these arrhythmias can be life-threatening.

A mild case is of little concern and usually does not affect life expectancy. Luckily, most cases are mild and do not require treatment; fairly severe disease is needed for clinical signs to appear.

Approximately 35-percent of dogs with severe pulmonic stenosis will show some or all of the following signs:

  • Tiring easily
  • Fainting spells (from the abnormal electrical heart rhythm)
  • Fluid accumulation in the belly
  • Blue-tinge to the gums, especially with exertion
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Sudden death

In some cases, medications called beta blockers can be used in an attempt to relax the muscles of the heart and open the stenosis. This will not relieve the constriction but could relieve it. In mild forms of the disease, medical management may offer the pet a good quality of life.

Dr. Schneiderman performing heart surgery using the C-arm at NorthStar VETS

Dr. Schneiderman performing heart surgery using the C-arm at NorthStar VETS

Clearly, if the obstruction at the pulmonic valve could be relieved, much of the problem would be solved. Severe pulmonic stenosis cases can be treated by doing just that. A special balloon is inserted into the pulmonic valve where it is inflated, breaking down the obstruction. The size of the balloon catheter is determined by echocardiography as described above. Dogs that have severe pulmonic stenosis should have this procedure regardless of whether or not they are showing clinical signs.

Performing this procedure reduces the risk of sudden death by 53-percent and improves quality of life as well. However, certain types of valve deformity are not amenable to this treatment.

If your family veterinarian believes your pet needs to see a specialist, contact NorthStar VETS at 609.259.8300 to schedule an appointment with one of our veterinary specialists.

Jennifer Schneiderman, DVM, DACVIM (Cardiology)Jennifer Schneiderman, DVM, DACVIM (Cardiology)
Dr. Schneiderman received her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine degree at Ross University in 2009 before moving back home to Long Island, New York where she completed a one-year rotating internship in small animal medicine and surgery at Atlantic Coast Veterinary Specialists in March 2010. After that, she completed a three-year residency in Cardiology at Atlantic Coast Veterinary Specialists in July 2013 and then stayed on there as a Staff Cardiologist until June 2014. Now a board-certified Veterinary Cardiologist, Dr. Schneiderman joined the NorthStar VETS team in August 2014. Her clinical interests include treatment of congestive heart failure and complex arrhythmias along with an interest in interventional procedures such as pacemaker implantation, balloon valvuloplasty and patent ductus arteriosus occlusion. Outside of work, Dr. Schneiderman enjoys traveling, scuba diving, going to the beach and spending time with her two tuxedo cats.


The information presented on this web site is not intended to take the place of your family veterinarian’s advice and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Discuss this information with your own veterinarian to determine what is right for your pet. All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We can not and do not give you medical advice via this blog. The information contained in this online site and emails is presented in summary form only and intended to provide broad understanding and knowledge. The information should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice of your veterinarian. We do not recommend the self-management of your pet’s health problems.

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VIP Brings Hope and Healing to Malawi this Summer


This past July, NorthStar VETS was back in Malawi, Africa to check up on the villagers our team had been helping there. Here is the summary report from Villages in Partnership.

“NorthStar VETS sent its Theriogenologist, Dr. Manoel Tamassia, to work with farmers and their livestock. He was joined by Pat Boland, veternarian for National Rural Poultry Centre in Malawi, along with others to discuss best practices. It is challenging to convince a farmer to care for an animal when their family is hungry. Feeding livestock will pay off in the long term, but long term planning is not a mindset when short term circumstances are dire.”

Dr. Tamassia working with local farmers in Malawi

“NJ State apiarist, Tim Schuler, returned to Malawi, thanks once again to NorthStar VETS. He continued to learn from, work and share knowledge with Malawian bee keepers. They harvested much honey and all enjoyed the spoils.”

Tim Schuler, State Apiarist, helping the people of Malawi secure honey to eat and wax to sell at market


The mission of Villages in Partnership is to build partnerships between villages in the developed world and villages in Malawi to bring about life-changing development for all. The organization works with local development experts in Malawi to implement programs designed to simultaneously address the inter-connected web of root causes of extreme poverty: lack of access to clean water, food insecurity, poor health care, inadequate education, insufficient infrastructure, and lack of economic opportunities.

Manoel Tamassia, DVM, MS, Ph.D, DACT
Dr. Tamassia left engineering school to attend veterinary school at the Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Brazil, where he graduated in 1989. With a strong interest in animal reproduction, he moved to Columbia, Missouri to start an internship in theriogenology, continuing his training by completing a residency in theriogenology and a master of science degree in reproductive physiology. Dr. Tamassia remained at the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine as an assistant instructor, during which time he completed the requirements for the ECFVG program (DVM equivalency for foreign graduates). He then moved to the University of Illinois, College of Veterinary Medicine working in the production animal and theriogenology section for three years.

Dr. Tamassia returned to Brazil in 1997 where he practiced and taught large-animal reproduction until he moved to Paris, France to continue his education at the Institut National Agronomique de Paris. For four years he worked with in-vitro fertilization and cloning, finishing his graduate studies and PhD in 2003. He returned to the U.S. to be an assistant professor in theriogenology at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois. In 2009, he was awarded Diplomate status in the American College of Theriogenology and joined NorthStar VETS, where he provides comprehensive reproductive medical services for all species. Dr. Tamassia also serves as the State Veterinarian for NJ under Governor Christie and oversees the NJ State Animal Health Diagnostic Lab.

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